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Forestry Courses and Forestry Major Description

Forestry Courses

UNDERGRADUATE FORESTRY COURSES [FOR]

FOR 100-1 Introduction to Forestry. Acquaints students with the broad field of multiple-use forestry. Special emphasis is given to forestry as a profession. Required field trips expenses.

FOR 201-3 Ecology of North American Forests. An introduction to forest ecology concepts, site factors, and forests of North America. Emphasis is placed on the silvics of tree species and the impact of soil, climate, and topography on forest vegetation. Forest site-community relationships of selected major North American forest ecosystems will be studied. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: Plant Biology 200, Plant and Soil Science 240, Biology 307, or consent of instructor.

FOR 202-3 Tree Identification Laboratory. Field and laboratory identification of native and exotic trees, shrubs and woody vines using leaf, twig, bark and fruit characteristics. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: Plant Biology 200.

FOR 220-2 Introduction to Forest Recreation. Trends in outdoor recreational use of wild lands and natural areas with emphasis on state and federal parks and forests. Introductory concepts in recreation resources management, visitor impact assessment and environmental interpretation.

FOR 285-3 Social Influences on Forestry. Study of, and practice in, methods used for effecting social change in forestry and allied natural resource fields. Case studies, readings and survey research methodology are used to develop an understanding of the role of public opinion in ecologically sound natural resource decision making. Prerequisite: senior standing, and a course in statistics.

FOR 308-4 - Mapping and GIS. Integrated use of mapping, aerial photographs, and field information to evaluate resources in the development of land management plans. topics range from aerial photo interpretation, to GIS database management and vegetation mapping. Course will include classroom presentations, field trips, and lab exercises. Requires field trip transportation fees and supplemental expenditures not to exceed $50 per course registrations. Prerequisite 201 and 351 or consent.

FOR 310-4 Practices of Silviculture. Detailed study of classical concepts and recently developed techniques utilized in silviculture treatment of forests. Major emphasis to be placed upon establishment, thinning, timber stand improvement, and regeneration of forest. Prerequisite: 331.

FOR 310C-1 Silviculture Field Studies. Field experience for the student in the various facets of silviculture including planning, thinning, harvesting, timber stand improvement, and site-growth relationships. Offered only at summer camp. Costs associated with course. Prerequisite: 310 and 331.

FOR 311-3 Resources Photogrammetry. The science and art of obtaining reliable measurement by means of photographs, detection of disease, insects, and fire invasion by remote sensors; and delineation of resources boundaries through interpretation.

FOR 313-3 Harvesting Forest Crops. Emphasis is given to lumber sale layouts, sale contracts, and harvest engineering methods. Consideration is given to the environmental impacts of harvesting. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: 310 or consent of instructor.

FOR 314-3 Forest Health. Detailed study of the factors that influence forest health, including abiotic stress, diseases, insects, andinvasive plants. Special emphasis will be placed on the identifications of the signs and symptoms of the factors that affect forest health and the appropriate management techniquest to mitigate these factors. Prerequisite: FOR 201, 331, or consent of instructor.

FOR 314C-2 Forest Protection Field Study. The prevention and suppression of forest fires, the recognition and control of insect and disease organisms and other destructive agents in the forest. Offered at summer camp only. Summer camp transprotation fees and consts are outlined in the Forestry major description - Forest Resource Management Specialization. May require supplemental expenditures not to exceed $25 per course registration. Prerequisite: FOR 331 and two of the following: FOR 314, 315 or PLB 357.

FOR 315-3 Fire in Wildland Management. Fire as a phenomenon in wildland management. Topics covered are fire prevention, detection, suppression, behavior, effects, use, and economics. Major emphasis is on fire control and fire ecology. Requires field trip transportation fees and supplemental expenditures. Prerequisite: 331 or consent of instructor.

FOR 320C-1 Forest and Wildlands Recreation Field Studies. Recreation of forest and adjacent lands with emphasis on parks and national forests. Administration; interpretation; trends in use and development. Offered at summer camp only. Summer camp transportation fees and costs. Prerequisite: 220

FOR 325-3 Forest Resources Administration and Policy. Nature of administrative organizations and influences on behavior of organization members. Society influences causing changes in forestry related organizations. Policy formation and implementation, including roles of special interest groups.

FOR 331-3 Forest Ecosystems. An analysis and integration of tree growth and of forest structure, material and energy flow, and classification in relation to climatic and edaphic factors to provide an ecological basis for management of forest ecosystems. Prerequisite: 201, 202, or consent of instructor.

FOR 341-3 Forestry Practices. The fundamentals of integrated resource management of timberlands. Management systems, tree stand measurements. Planting and harvesting methods, multiple-use aspects of forest lands. Field trips. Emphasis on small forest ownerships. Not for graduation credit in forest resource's management.

FOR 350-3 Wood as a Raw Material. Structure, identification, and properties of wood. Important species, significance of properties to end-use and significance of wood to the environment.

FOR 351-4 Forest Measurements. Introductory measurement, statistical and data processing concepts; volume, growth, and yield of forest products; methods of sampling forest resources. Requires field trip transportation fees and supplemental expenditures. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110 or 140; and Mathematics 282 or Plant Biology 360 or Agribusiness Economics 318.

FOR 351C-1 Forest Resources Measurements Field Studies. Methods of determining volume and quality of forest products, forest resource inventory procedures, growth, and productivity studies. Field trips. Costs associated with course. Prerequisite: 351.

FOR 360C-1 Forest Industries Field Studies. A study of primary and secondary forest product processing in the central hardwood region. Course requires field trips. Costs associated with course.

FOR 381-1 Forestry Seminar. Presentation of topics pertinent to multiple-use management and utilization of forest resources. Prerequisite: senior standing.

FOR 391-1 to 4 Special Problems in Forest Resources. Independent research sufficiently important to require three hours per week of productive work for each hour of credit.

*FOR 401-3 Fundamentals of Environmental Education. (Same as Agriculture 401 and Recreation 401) A survey course designed to help education majors develop an understanding of environmental education principles and teaching both inside and outside the classroom. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: ten hours of biological science or ten hours of recreation and/or education, or consent of instructor.

*FOR 402-3 Wildland Hydrology. Fundamentals of hydrology as related to forest and wildland water resources will be emphasized. Considerations will include the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on soil and groundwater regimes, evapotranspiration, surface and subsurface runoff, and the quantity and timing of water yield. Offered spring semester odd years.

*FOR 403-3 Agroforestry. This introductory, lecture-discussion course will examine the various agroforestry concepts, systems, technologies and practices. Focus will be on the potential use and benefits of agroforestry, which involves the deliberate combining of woody perennials with herbaceous/agronomic crops and/or animals, on the same land management unit, in some form of spatial arrangement and/or temporal sequence to produce desirable ecological and economical interactions among the different components. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor.

*FOR 405-2 Forest Management for Wildlife. Interrelations between forest practices and wildlife populations. Emphasis is on habitat requirements of different wildlife species and ways to manipulate the forest to improve wildlife habitats. Prerequisite: forestry major, or consent of instructor.

FOR 406-2 Landscape Ecology. (Same as FOR 506) (FOR 506- 3, will have an additional lab requirement) Principles of landscape ecology in the context of forested systems. There is an emphasis on how spatial heterogeneity and human activities influence landscape patterns. Prerequisite: G.I.S. course or consent of instructor.

*FOR 409-3 Forest Resources Decision-Making. Examines management planning decision-making for multiple- use forests particularly in the public sector. Reviews concepts useful for analyzing flow-resource problems, emphasizing systems approaches, introduces use of modern quantitative methods to evaluate resource use alternatives. Case studies. Prerequisite: 411, Mathematics 140.

*FOR 411-3 Forest Resources Economics. Application of Micro- and Macro-economic principles to forest timber and non-timber production; capital theory, benefit-cost analysis; and economics of conservation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 140 and Economics 240 or Agribusiness Economics 204.

*FOR 412-2 Tree Improvement. Basic theories and techniques of obtaining genetically superior trees for forest regeneration. Prerequisite: senior standing.

*FOR 414-3 Information Management. The collection of physical, biological, and social variables in the field of forestry through sampling survey. The procedures of data manipulation and calculation and the presentation of graphs and tables.

*FOR 415-3 Urban Ecosystem Management. An introduction to fundamental concepts and processes associated with urban environments. Emphasis is on physical, chemical, and biological stresses imposed on landscapes and water resources influenced by land use conversion and subsequent urban sprawl. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

*FOR 416-4 Forest Resource Management. The application of business procedures and technical forestry principles to manage forest properties. Emphasis on integrated resource management for tangible and intangible benefits. Requires field trip transportation fee and supplemental expenditures. Prerequisite: completion of Forest Resource summer camp or consent of instructor.

*FOR 417-2 Forest Land-Use Planning. Principles of location theory as a basis for determining land use; supply of forest land; population pressure and demand; conservation principles; determination of forest land values; institutional factors influencing forest land-use; forest taxation; special taxes, and capital gains. Taught in alternate years. Prerequisite: 411 or consent of instructor.

*FOR 418-2 Marketing of Forest Products. The role of marketing in the forest industries; review of economic principles; product policy, planning the product line, pricing, marketing channels, marketing programs, marketing organization, and marketing research as influences on the marketing of lumber, wood products, pulp, and paper. Taught in alternate years. Prerequisite: 411 or consent of instructor.

*FOR 420-3 Park and Wildlands Management. The management of state and federal parks and recreation areas. A systems approach toward management and decision-making will be emphasized. Requires field trip transportation fee and supplemental expenditures. Prerequisite: Forestry 320c.

*FOR 421-3 Recreation Land-Use Planning. Principles and methods for land-use planning of park and recreation environments with emphasis on human dimensions of natural resource research. Focus on planning process and types of information to gather and organize. Application in group field projects. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: 220, 420, or consent of instructor.

FOR 422C-4 Park and Wildlands Management Camp. A study of park conditions, visitors, and management practices at selected county, state, and federal park systems in the United States, including the federal wilderness preservation system. Offered as summer camp only. Summer camp fees and costs. Prerequisite: 220 and 320c and consent of instructor.

*FOR 423-3 Environmental Interpretation. (Same as Agriculture 423 and Recreation 423) Principles and techniques of natural and cultural interpretation. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: ten hours biological science and ten hours of recreation.

*FOR 428-2 Urban Forestry. An introduction to principles and practices useful in the management of trees and forests in populated settings. Emphasis is placed on the development of comprehensive management strategies consistent with the biological, physical, economic and social constraints of the urban environment. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

*FOR 429-2 Watershed Management Field Laboratory. A field intensive laboratory course focused on hydrological and biological methods used to manage watersheds and assess watershed health. Laboratory topics include stream gauging, soil water and ground water sampling, channel morphology, stream benthos measurements, and water quality analysis of stream and lake ecosystems. Requires field trip transportation fee.

*FOR 430-3 Wildland Watershed Management. Emphasis is placed on the principles, technical problems, procedures, alternatives, and consequences encountered in managing wildland watersheds for the production of quality water in harmony with other uses. Prerequisite: 331.

*FOR 431-3 Regional Silviculture. Designed to evaluate the various silvicultural practices as they are commonly employed in various regions of the United States. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: 310.

*FOR 451-2 Natural Resources Inventory. Theory and practical problems in biometrics to obtain estimates of natural resource populations. Use of computers and other advanced techniques. Case studies of inventory procedures. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: 351 or consent of instructor.

*FOR 452-2 Forest Soils. Characterization and fundamental concepts of forest soils and their relationships to forest communities and forest management practices. Emphasis is on the chemical, biological and physical properties of soils as related to forests and forest management. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: Plant and Soil Science 240.

*FOR 452L-2 Forest Soils Laboratory. Companion laboratory for 452. Emphasis is on methods to characterize and evaluate the chemical, physical, and biological properties of forest soils. Prerequisite: Plant and Soil Science 240 and concurrent registration in Forestry 452. Spring semester even years.

*FOR 453-2 Environmental Impact Assessment in Forestry. Methods of assessing the environmental impact of land-use systems on forest resources and assessing the impact of forest management systems on environmental quality are presented. Case studies culminating in the preparation of environmental impact statements are emphasized. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: senior standing in a natural resource major.

*FOR 454, A-D-2 to 8 Forest Ecology Field Studies. A study of forest communities, soils, and site conditions in one of the following ecosystems: (a) Boreal; (b) lake states; (c) Southern Appalachians; (d) Southern pine. Course requires a field trip of about 10 days. Each trip is two semester credits; a maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward graduate credit. Requires field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: senior standing in natural resources or biological sciences, courses in tree identification, forest ecology, and soils, and consent of instructor.

*FOR 460-2 Forest Industries. Analysis of raw material requirements, the processes and the products of forest industries. The environmental impact of each forest industry will also be discussed.

*FOR 470-2 Wilderness Management, Policy, and Ethics. Study of current management philosophy and practice in America's wilderness. Analysis of current wilderness policy and its historical evolution. Discussion of the evolution of the wilderness idea and the individuals that have influenced it. Weekend field trip required. Required field trip transportation fee. Prerequisite: 220 or consent of instructor.

FOR 471-3 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Issues. Application of concepts for the biological, physical and social sciences, economics, humanities and law, are used to understand the interdisciplinary complexities of environmental issues. Students will develop and demonstrate problem-solving skills as part of a team analyzing a regional environmental issue. Team-taught seminar style discussions. Prerequisite: Plant Biology 301I and admission to Environmental Studies minor program.

*FOR 480-3 Natural Resource Conflict Management. Examines the role and methods of interest groups in influencing natural resource policies. Emphasis on applied methods, techniques and strategies for achieving interest group objectives in conflict resolution and persuasion theory. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor.

FOR 490A-2 Resources Management Consortium. Intensive field course in resources management decision making. Student serves as team member in solving resource problems in forestry, wildlife management, recreation, and interpretation at Land Between the Lakes. Enrollment is limited to six. Course taught at Land Between the Lakes. Requires transportation, room and board fee. Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FOR 492-1 to 4 Special Studies for Honor Students. Research and individual problems in forestry. Not for graduate credit. Prerequisite: consent of the department chair and a 3.0 minimum grade point average.

*FOR 494, A-C-1 to 6 Practicum. Supervised practicum in a professional setting. Emphasis on administration, supervision, teaching and program leadership in community, school, park, forest, institution, and public or private agencies. Students should enroll according to their curriculum specialization: (a) Forest environmental assessment, (b) outdoor recreation resource management, (c) forest resources management. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

  • Note: Fees are associated with many courses. Consult current Undergraduate Course Catalog for exact amounts.
  • Note: (*) 400 level classes that can be taken for graduate or undergraduate credit.
  • Note: Some courses may only be offered in the fall or spring semester. Please check with your academic advisor before planning your schedule.

GRADUATE COURSES: FORESTRY [FOR]

FOR 500-2 Principles of Research. Research philosophy, approaches to research; theory, hypotheses inference, and predicting; problem identification, project development and organization; methods of data collection, analysis and presentation; drawing conclusions and organizing results. Prerequisite: four hours in statistical methods or consent of instructor.

FOR 501-1 Graduate Seminar. Presentation and critiques of current research project of faculty, graduate student and selected resource persons.

FOR 502-3 Advanced Watershed Hydrology and Management. A study of current issues relating to hydrology and the management of water resources in forested and mixed land-use watersheds. Readings, discussions and projects will focus on research and management topics in water quality and quantity at regional, national and international levels. Prerequisite: 402 or 430 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

FOR 504-2 Tree Physiology Concepts and Applications. A study of physiological concepts and attributes of trees that underlies growth, ontogeny, and reproduction in the context of genotype, environment, and their interaction. Physiological concepts will be presented and discussed in a framework that relates their influence on forest stand management applications and activities such as regeneration, tree planting, silvicultural activities in native forestand plantations, and stand response to disturbance, and the development and maintenance of old growth. Prerequisite: Plant Biology 200, Forestry 331 or a plant physiology course.

FOR 506-3 Advanced Landscape Ecology. (Same as 406) (506-3 will have an additional lab requirement) Review and evaluation of current research and concepts in landscape ecology management. Principles of landscape ecology in the context of forested systems will be presented and discussed. Emphasis on how spatial heterogeneity and human activities influence landscape patterns. Prerequisite: G.I.S. course or consent of instructor.

FOR 508-2 Historical Ecology. Introduction to the basic concepts and foundations of historical ecology, a discipline which joins traditional ecology with an investigation of human landscape transformation. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary approach to historical ecology with readings in pollen analysis, dendrochronology, land-use history, archival and historical sources, and traditional vegetation surveys and reconstructions. Field trip costs. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: 300 level plant ecology course or equivalent or consent of instructor.

FOR 510-2 Advanced Silviculture. Current and emerging silvicultural issues and their underlying biological principles are discussed. Experimental methodologies and their application to forest management problems are critiqued. Prerequisite: undergraduate courses in forest ecology and silviculture or consent of the instructor.

FOR 511-2 Advanced Forest Resources Economics. Application of microeconomic, macroeconomic and capital theory to forest resource problems; introductory econometric methods; long range supply and demand projections; international forest economics and policy problems decision theory in forest resource management. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: 411 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

FOR 512-2 Tree Selection and Breeding. Quantitative methods of describing variation patterns of trees, testing genetic and environmental effects and interactions and evaluations of tree improvement program. Prerequisite: 412 or consent of instructor.

FOR 515-3 Advanced Urban Ecosystem Management. An examination of concepts and processes associated with urban environments. Physical, chemical, and biological stresses associated with land use change and urban sprawl will be discussed and presented with a focus on water resourcs. Class discussion, readings, and projects will concentrate on current research in the urban environment. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

FOR 516-2 Advanced Forest Management. Case studies in forest land management, management planning, utilizing computer programming, CFI and TSI role in long range management planning. Offered alternate years-;odd. Prerequisite: 416, 331 and summer camp or consent of instructor.

FOR 520-2 Advanced Park Planning. Study of nature and functions of the recreation environmental planning process in theoretical and policy terms. Types of plans at local, regional and state levels. Evaluation of different types of planning approaches and their utility in particular situations. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: 421 or consent of instructor.

FOR 521-2 Recreation Behavior in Wildlands Environments. Review of sociological and psychological theories relevant to outdoor recreation planning; management alternatives. Review of current behavior research in outdoor recreation. Application of behavioral concepts to recreation planning and administration. Offered alternate years.

FOR 523-2 Advanced Resource Interpretation. Survey of theories and methods relating to resource interpretation planning and practice resulting from research in communication, education and marketing. Examines case studies and existing issues current to the profession of interpretation. Stresses relationship between theory and application. Prerequisite: 423 or consent of instructor. Offered alternate years.

FOR 530-2 Forest Site Evaluation. A discussion of the factors affecting site quality and their use in present site evaluation methods. Lectures will draw upon recently published scientific literature as well as forest research data collected and analyzed for southern Illinois forests. Laboratories will include sampling of forest sites and stands with subsequent analysis of data using graphic and statistical techniques and a computer to develop site evaluation models. Cost $20. Prerequisite: 300, Biology 307 or consent of instructor.

FOR 531-2 Disturbance Ecology. Provide a historical overview and current perspective on major topics in forest ecology including natural disturbance, gap and patch dynamics, and relevant restoration ecology techniques. This is accomplished through a critical examination of the literature through reading, group discussions, and field trips. Two to three field trips will be organized during the semester to observe the effects of natural disturbance. Field trip fee. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: 300 level plant ecology course (or equivalent) or consent of instructor.

FOR 585-3 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management. Multidisciplinary study of influences and constraints on human-renewable natural resource interactions. Readings, discussion and problem solving designed to enhance appreciation of human dimensions as an integral component of natural resource management. Emphasis on diverse perspectives on forests, fisheries and willife; conceptual frameworks and research methodologies. Prerequisite: course in statistics or consent of instructor. Offered alternate (odd) years.

FOR 588-1 to 6 International Graduate Studies. University residential graduate program abroad. Prior approval by the department is required both for the nature of program and the number of hours of credit.

FOR 590-1 to 4 Readings in Forest Resources. Intensive consideration is given to current practices and problems in forestry. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FOR 591A-G 1 to 4 Directed Studies in Forest Resources. Intensive study of disciplines fundamental to forestry. (a) Dendrology. Study of the identification of native and exotic trees. (b) Forest Autecology. Study of the physiology of individual tree species in relation to their environment. (c) Forest Community Ecology. Study analysis and integration of tree growth, forest structure and classification in relation to climate/edaphic factors as an ecological basis for forest management. (d) Forest Measurements. Study of measurement, statistical and data processing concepts; volume, growth, yield of forest products and methods of sampling forest resources. (e) Forest Recreation. Study of principles and methods for land-use planning of park and recreation environments. (f) Silviculture. Study of concepts and techniques utilized in the silvicultural treatment of forests. (g) Wildland Fire Management. Study of all aspects of fire as a phenomenon in wildland management. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FOR 593-1 to 4 Individual Research. Directed research in selected fields of forestry.

FOR 599-1 to 6 Thesis.A minimum of three and a maximum of number of 6 thesis hours asre required.

FOR 601-1 per semester Continuing Enrollment. For those graduate students who have not finished their degree programs and who are in the process of working on their dissertation, thesis, or research paper. The student must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of dissertation research, or the minimum thesis, or research hours before being eligible to register for this course. Concurrent enrollment in any other course is not permitted. Graded S/U or DEF only.

  • Note: Fees are associated with many courses. Consult current Graduate Course Catalog for exact amounts.
  • Note: Some courses may only be offered in the fall or spring semester. Please check with your academic advisor before planning your schedule.